Wests Tigers captain Robbie Farah today joined Kangaroos team mates in receiving their playing and formal kit for the 14th Rugby League World Cup.


Four Nations champions Australia officially assemble for training on Sunday for their first training session, but this was a chance for the squad to begin preparations to win back the World Cup from New Zealand.


The stars of the current game joined the legends of yesteryear at Rugby League Central as today's stars met with the venerable 1963 Kangaroos, regarded by many as the greatest side ever to go away. They were the first to win the Ashes on British soil.


That side included Western Suburbs legends Noel Kelly and Peter Diamond as well as Immortals John Raper, Reg Gasnier and Graham Langlands.


"There's excitement at the moment, we got in today and got all our gear," said Farah.


"We got the suit, the nice blazer on and we've got lunch with the 1963 Kangaroos."


If Farah is selected to play for his country, he will line up against the likes of Marika Koroibete (Fiji) and Pat Richards (Ireland) in the group stages and won't be holding back against his Wests Tigers team mates.


"There's no club team mates when you pull on the colours of your country and I'm sure those boys will be representing their country with pride, as we will," said Farah.


"Hopefully I get the opportunity to play against Marika and big Patty who has been in great form for Wigan."


While Farah's focus is undoubtably on winning the World Cup for Australia, the Club captain will look to use the tournament to improve himself as a player and bring that experience back to pre-season training in 2014.


"Playing in those big games definitely makes you a better player, hopefully I can bring that back and the other boys can rub off on that," said Farah.


"You always learn things on a seven-week tour.


"There's no doubt I'll try and bring what I can back to Wests Tigers."


While the weather in Sydney today was stifling with temperatures reaching to the high 30s, it will be a different story come the business end of the tournament in the Northern Hemisphere winter.


"It's always tough conditions over there with the cold and it'll get colder as the competition goes on," said Farah.


"I'm sure the further we get in towards the end of November it's going to get pretty cold so that's something we're going to have to adapt to.


"England are always tough at home in those conditions."